Growing Primrose – Primrose Plants In Your Garden

Primrose flowers (Primula polyantha) bloom in early spring, offering a variety of form, size, and color. They are suitable for use in garden beds and borders as well as in containers or for naturalizing areas of the lawn. In fact, when given the proper growing conditions, these vigorous plants will multiply each year, adding stunning colors to the landscape. Blooming often lasts throughout summer and in some areas, they will continue to delight the fall season with their outstanding colors. Most primrose flowers seen in gardens are Polyanthus hybrids, which range in color from white, cream and yellow to orange, red and pink. There are also purple and blue primrose flowers. These perennial plants prefer damp, woodland-like conditions.

Growing Primrose Plants

primroses

Growing primrose is easy, as these plants are quite hardy and adaptable. You can find primrose perennials at most garden centers and nurseries. Look for primroses that are healthy in appearance, preferably with unopened buds. Primroses can also be grown from seeds with an equal mixture of soil, sand and peat moss. This can be done indoors or out depending on the time of year and the climate in your area. Generally, seeds are sown indoors (outdoors in cold frame) during winter. Once seedlings have obtained their second or third leaves, they can be transplanted into the garden. Cuttings can also be taken from some varieties during summer. Primrose Care Primrose perennials should be planted in lightly shaded areas with well-drained soil, preferably amended with organic matter. Set primrose plants about 6 to 12 inches apart and 4 to 6 inches deep. Water thoroughly after planting. Add a layer of mulch around the plants to help retain moisture. Continue to give your primroses thorough watering throughout the summer months, about once a week or more during periods of drought, but let off once fall approaches. The primrose flower also appreciates light applications of organic fertilizer throughout the growing season. Keep primrose plants looking their best with regular pruning of dead leaves and spent blooms. If you want to collect the seeds of your primroses, wait until late summer or early fall before taking them. Store them in a cool, dry place until the following planting season or sow them in a cold frame. Problems with Primrose Perennials Slugs and snails are common pests affecting primrose plants. These can be controlled with non-toxic slug bait placed around the garden. Spider mites and aphids may also attack primroses but can be sprayed with soapy water. If primrose plants are not getting enough drainage, they may also be prone to crown rot and root rot. This can be easily fixed by amending the soil with compost or relocating the plants to a well-drained site. Too much moisture can also make the primrose flower susceptible to fungal infections. This can often be prevented by using good watering habits and adequate spacing between plants. Growing primroses is easy when given the proper growing conditions and following primrose care guidelines.

primrose-houseplants

Growing Primroses Indoors: Tips For Primrose Indoor Care

The primrose houseplant (Primula) is often found for sale in the late winter or early spring. The cheery flowers on primroses can do quite a bit to chase away winter’s dreariness, but they also leave many owners asking how to grow primrose indoors. Primrose indoor care is important if you would like these lovely plant to survive. How to Grow Primrose Indoors The first thing to remember about your primrose houseplant is that the people who sold it to you did not expect you to keep it as a houseplant. Primroses indoors are typically thought of by the houseplant industry as a short term houseplant (much like orchids and poinsettias). They are sold with the intention of providing a few weeks of bright flowers and then discarded after the blooms have faded. While growing primroses indoors beyond their bloom span is possible, it is not always easy. Because of this, many people choose to simply plant their primrose houseplant out into the garden after the flowers are gone. If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in

Primroses indoors are typically thought of by the houseplant industry as a short term houseplant (much like orchids and poinsettias). They are sold with the intention of providing a few weeks of bright flowers and then discarded after the blooms have faded. While growing primroses indoors beyond their bloom span is possible, it is not always easy. Because of this, many people choose to simply plant their primrose houseplant out into the garden after the flowers are gone. If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in

If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in the dry soil. Primroses indoors also need high humidity. You can raise the humidity around the primrose plant by placing it on a pebble tray. It is important to your success of growing primroses indoors that these plants be kept in temperatures below 80 F. They grow best in temperatures between 50 and 65 F.(10-18 C.).

Primrose houseplants should be fertilized about once a month except for when they are in bloom. They should not be fertilized at all when in bloom. Getting a primrose growing indoors to bloom again is difficult. Most people have success if they move their primrose outdoors during the summer months and bring it back inside for the winter where the plant should be allowed to go dormant for one to two months. Even with all this, there are only even odds that your primrose houseplant will bloom again.

Regardless of whether you decide to keep your primrose after it blooms or not, proper primrose indoor care will ensure that its bright, winter chasing blooms last as long as possible.

Primrose Plant Problems: Common Diseases And Pests Of Primula

primrose-leavesPrimrose are among the first flowers to bloom in spring, and they grace many gardens around the country. These bright flowering plants are also called Primula, which is their genus name.

Proper planting and culture can prevent many primula plant problems, but it is a good idea to become familiar with some of the diseases and pests of primula.

Problems with Primroses: Your first, and most important, step to avoiding primula plant problems is planting them correctly. Many primula disease problems can be avoided by good cultural habits.

Primroses do best in your garden if you plant them in a cool section that offers the plants lots of bright light. It is essential to preventing primula disease problems to select a site with excellent drainage since the primula roots can be damaged in winter when soil is wet or heavy. These plants do best if you mix organic compost into the soil before planting and provide regular irrigation during the growing season. These tips about how to grow primroses help keep down problems with primroses. They also extend the flowering season for these plants.

Pests of Primula: Even with the best of cultural care, some pests of primula can attack your plants. You’ll want to be familiar with them so that you can recognize a problem and take quick action to protect your plants when necessary. The vine weevil is the most destructive of the pests of primula. Young weevils are grubs, the color of cream with brown heads. They are soil dwellers and eat primula roots. If a plant collapses suddenly, it may indicate a weevil infestation. You’ll want to remove and destroy infected plants and dispose of infested soil to prevent the spread of these pests. The adult weevil is brown and looks like a beetle. Adults appear in fall and can eat notches out of the edges of leaves. Trap adult pests by leaving out rolls of corrugated paper or flower pots stuffed with fresh grass. Inspect and empty your traps every day. Sometimes you can also stop adults from laying eggs on the plants by placing gravel around them. If all else fails, chemical treatments are also available at your garden store. Other pests of primula include root aphids – which can often be controlled by keeping the garden bed free of weeds. Slugs, mice, and birds may also eat the flowers or foliage.

Primula Disease Problems: The most important fungal disease of primula is botrytis. You can often avoid this issue by ensuring that the air circulates around the plants. Don’t give the plants too much water in cold winter conditions. If the fungus appears, spray with a fungicide. If your plants get root rot, damping off or crown rot, they wilt and die. You’ll need to throw out infected plants and apply a fungicide to healthy plants to protect them. If your plant growth is stunted and they seem to be branching too much and show yellow, strap-shaped leaves, they may have yellow asters, another of the primula disease problems. You’ll have to throw away primroses infected by this disease.

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