Best Herbal Iced Teas for Summer

PRO TIPS FOR MAKING ICED TEA:

  • Brew your iced tea a little stronger than you would if you were going to enjoy it hot since the ice will water down the tea infusion and its flavor.
  • Some heat is required for the initial brewing, and this can be done either on the stovetop or as a sun brewed tea. Sun teas take more time but less work to make, requiring three to five hours in direct sunlight to properly infuse.
  • Once your tea has brewed and cooled, store in the fridge for optimal shelf life and consume within a week or less.

Iced tea is one of the joys of summer! Get ready for those hot days with our guide to the best teas to serve iced.

Source: Best Herbal Iced Teas for Summer

5 Herbal Iced Teas for Summer:

  1. Mint Tea
    This delightful blend is made with mints from the Pacific Northwest and is also a favorite among children. Mint tea makes a lovely base for many summer drinks including minty lemonade and summer punch. Happy for the tummy and the tongue.
  2. Lemon Tea
    Refreshing and citrusy, this makes a fantastic iced tea and would be a delicious low-sugar alternative to lemonade. It’s a great way to explore a variety of lemony herbs. Add in fresh berries to give it a fun, fruity kick.
  3. Green Sunrise Tea
    Citrusy and floral, this tea is made with Dao Ren and is a smooth and refreshing option for green tea lovers. Add a touch of honey or agave syrup to sweeten and then finish it off with fresh muddled mint.
  4. Mint Chocolate Maté
    Smooth and minty, this caffeinated tea will cool you down and pick you up on hot summer days. Turn this one into an iced tea latte by adding a splash of coconut milk.
  5. Hibiscus Flower Tea
    Steep some deliciously tart hibiscus flowers and pour over ice for a simple, summery beverage. Add a splash of pomegranate juice and your choice of sweetener to make this fruity drink and satisfying for all ages.

There are lots of ways to enjoy the goodness of plants, but for accessibility and simplicity, it’s hard to beat a good cup of tea. Herbal tea blends are a fantastic way to combine the synergistic qualities of different plant allies, and creating your own allows you to craft steepable combinations that cater to your personal nutrition goals and flavor preferences. With such a wide world of botanicals to choose from, however, it can sometimes be hard to know where to start. Luckily, we’ve been crafting organic tea blends for decades, and we’re all too happy to share some of the strategies we’ve picked up along the way!

 

Here, we begin with a basic three-step method for crafting delicious and nutritive herbal brews. Once you are comfortable with a few simple blends, it becomes easier to branch out into more complex combinations. While technically these caffeine-free herbal infusions are referred to as “tisanes” (only brews made from traditional tea leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant are true teas), we will use the term “tea” here to discuss our steeped herbal beverages.

teablends

This fun tool will help inspire and guide your adventures in creating your own tea blends from a wide range of different herbs and spices. Start by considering the motivation for creating your herbal blend; are you looking to support your immune system, encourage a relaxed state of mind, or just want to experiment with new flavors? Use your preferred herb as the “base ingredient.” Then, add a “supporting” ingredient for a complementary effect or flavor. The final ingredient is an “accent” which adds a pop of flavor and can round out the other two ingredients.

These proportions are conceptual and not set in stone, so you have the freedom to experiment. Start with 3 parts base ingredient, 1 to 2 parts supporting, and 1/4 to 1 part accent, and then make adjustments as needed. You will find that herbs often switch roles from one blend to the next. Feel free to begin adding additional ingredients once you are comfortable with your blending skills!

Additional research may be necessary if you are addressing specific health concerns, and we always recommend consulting a qualified medical practitioner if you are unsure of what herbs may be best for your individual needs.

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